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Pearls of Pet Wisdom

SEIZURE ACTIVITY IN OUR PETS

Posted on 17 September, 2014 at 9:00

HAVE YOU HEARD?  IT'S ADOPT A SHELTER PET DAY!

 


(KIR) SEIZURE ACTIVITY IN OUR PETS CAN BE SCARY…KNOW WHAT TO DO, KNOWLEDGE WILL KEEP YOU CALM AND SAVE YOU MONEY

 

Seizures in cats and dogs can be caused by several reasons including congenital disease, metabolic abnormalities, infectious disease, inflammatory diseases, toxins and intracranial tumors.

 

**Note: I will not be covering specific diseases or treatment options, just what to do if you witness your pet having a seizure.

 

Most seizures that pet owners witness consist of their pet either becoming stiff and non-responsive or full blown ‘grand mal’ seizures which are fully body convulsions. Often the pet will salivate, urinate, and or defecate during a seizure event. There are also atypical seizures that can look very different than either of the aforementioned. Seizures typically last no more than 60-90 seconds, although when we are watching our pets go through this it seems like forever.

 

Reasons to visit your local veterinarian or an emergency clinic immediately:

· Your pet is under the age of 1 (very young pets can either have a low blood glucose or congenital disease)

· Your pet has more than 1 seizure within 24 hours

· Your pet has ‘cluster’ seizures (seizures that occur consecutively within a time frame, with little time in between)

· There is a chance your pet may have ingested something that is poisonous

· Any one seizure lasts for several minutes (this can be extremely damaging to the brain and lead to dangerous body temperatures that affect internal organs adversely

 

 

(TBS) Try to stay calm, keep your pet away from stairs or anywhere else they can harm themselves should they seizure again. Do not stick your fingers in their mouths because you will get bitten. This is because your pet is not in control, mentally or physically, during the seizure. If you have a very young pet, please try your best to rub something sweet (nutri-cal, honey, etc) on their gums AFTER the seizure activity stops.

 

Reasons to visit your local veterinarian at your earliest convenience:

· Your pet has had a seizure, any seizure, of any duration, at any age regardless how small or big (depending on the individual pet’s condition and other information, your veterinarian may recommend diagnostics to rule out the possible causes, may include blood work, x-rays, urine testing, MRI/CT)

 

**Dr. PetLover is available for appointments to evaluate pets that have seizured as long as they do not warrant emergent care**

 

**This blog was requested by Dr. PetLover mini who wants to share with you how we manage our 19 year old cat, Binky, when she has seizures**

 

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